pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

The roughly mid-90's and earlier (generally pre-Toonami, pre-anime boom) era of anime & manga fandom: early cons, clubs, tape trading, Nth Generation VHS fansubs, old magazines & fanzines, fandubs, ancient merchandise, rec.arts.anime, and more!
Fireminer
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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by Fireminer » Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:25 pm

davemerrill wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:14 am
here are some answers:

1. I don't know Vecchio's exact service details. He moved to Atlanta from Florida; in Florida he'd been involved in the Orlando club JACO, and a JACO member named Daric had earlier moved to Atlanta. Joe later moved to Atlanta and roomed with Daric.

2. Joe, along with Lloyd Carter and Stan Dahlin and Daric and several other people, was a member of the Atlanta anime club "Anime X". In 1994 Daric held a party at his place and a lot of anime fans showed up, and we threw a different party later in the year that a lot of different anime fans came to, and we all figured that if we held a convention we could probably convince enough people to attend. That's how we started AWA. Lloyd Carter and myself and Joe were the three administrators of AWA when it began. Joe stepped down as an administrator in the late 1990s and Stan Dahlin took his place. Matt Murray was on staff for AWA but was not a director or an administrator.

3. You can read about Matt's adventures with the organizers of Magnum Opus Con here: http://cornponeflicks.org/kroniesmain.html

4. I don't know of any connection between Betsy Goodrich and anime, other than anime being something she's watched.
What happened to Roland Castle eventually? Is he still alive? Is it safe for me to mention his name?

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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by Fireminer » Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:32 pm

davemerrill wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:14 am
here are some answers:

1. I don't know Vecchio's exact service details. He moved to Atlanta from Florida; in Florida he'd been involved in the Orlando club JACO, and a JACO member named Daric had earlier moved to Atlanta. Joe later moved to Atlanta and roomed with Daric.

2. Joe, along with Lloyd Carter and Stan Dahlin and Daric and several other people, was a member of the Atlanta anime club "Anime X". In 1994 Daric held a party at his place and a lot of anime fans showed up, and we threw a different party later in the year that a lot of different anime fans came to, and we all figured that if we held a convention we could probably convince enough people to attend. That's how we started AWA. Lloyd Carter and myself and Joe were the three administrators of AWA when it began. Joe stepped down as an administrator in the late 1990s and Stan Dahlin took his place. Matt Murray was on staff for AWA but was not a director or an administrator.

3. You can read about Matt's adventures with the organizers of Magnum Opus Con here: http://cornponeflicks.org/kroniesmain.html

4. I don't know of any connection between Betsy Goodrich and anime, other than anime being something she's watched.
What eventually happened to Roland Castle anyway? Is he still alive? Is it safe for me to mention him?

Also, who was the right holder of MADOX-01 back in the day? Walter Amos mentioned that the Japanese right holders were big Wizardry fans and so they agreed to sell the licensing right to Robert Woodhead at only 4000 yen.

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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by DKop » Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:56 pm

From what I've heard on Madox from Robert, it was in a pile of stuff they could license for really cheap, including Vampire Princess Miyu. I think that can be confirmed in the interviews I did with him on an old podcast found here:

https://ia801406.us.archive.org/20/item ... opart1.mp3

https://ia800308.us.archive.org/21/item ... opart2.mp3

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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by DKop » Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:57 pm


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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by davemerrill » Wed Mar 20, 2019 6:10 am

Fireminer wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:32 pm


What eventually happened to Roland Castle anyway? Is he still alive? Is it safe for me to mention him?

Also, who was the right holder of MADOX-01 back in the day? Walter Amos mentioned that the Japanese right holders were big Wizardry fans and so they agreed to sell the licensing right to Robert Woodhead at only 4000 yen.
Last I heard Roland was working at a Sam's Club in Athens Georgia. MOC's last convention was in 2001, and his comic shop moved three times and finally closed. Including Roland Castle in any discussion of "prominent figures in early anime fandom" is probably not necessary, he was not an anime fan, his involvement with anime fans didn't happen until the late 1980s, and was tangential at best.

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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by Fireminer » Wed Mar 20, 2019 7:12 am

DKop wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:57 pm
Forgot about this bit: https://aoypodcast.com/2015/08/10/aoy-p ... nus-track/
Thanks! I will sure look into it!

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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by Fireminer » Sun Apr 14, 2019 7:10 am

Anyone here know how can I reach out to Luke Mecnichelli of C/FO Philadelphia? I know from this website that Luke is still active at the Philadelphia Animation Society, but that is just it.

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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by Fireminer » Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:04 am

davemerrill wrote:
Tue Mar 05, 2019 12:40 pm
I traded tapes with some California fans and sometimes would just send blanks and return postage for copies and people seemed to be pretty open about copying anime, but this was in the 1986-87-88 time frame, a little later than the C/FO meeting shown in the video.

I do know that there were some California anime fans who charged $5 a tape to make copies, and others in California and (around the country) had a system where you would send them two blank tapes and get one back with your requests, and they'd keep the other one. I didn't do this myself, but I can see where someone who was overwhelmed with tape trading requests might want to cut down on the number of tapes they were copying without getting anything in return.

It did seem like every city circa 1987-88 had a guy who would set up a table at the local comic convention selling bootleg anime tapes. I think a lot of anime fans got their first tapes from these bootleggers. I know my first copy of the Galaxy Express movie came on a Kodak T-120 and I paid $10 for it.

What I don't know are the exact LA C/FO official tape copying policies. There must have been some sort of arrangement; somebody there was copying enough tapes to make the creation of a custom color bar test pattern worthwhile. However, being a C/FO chapter did not mean access to videotapes or copying privileges. There wasn't anybody in Los Angeles taping stuff for us in Atlanta, that's for sure.

I will say this for the San Antonio iteration of the national C/FO - they had a tape copying system in place. You'd send in blanks and return postage, somebody in San Antonio (probably Robert Gibson) would copy your request, and they'd mail it back to you.

Anime Hasshin didn't have a central service, but they did have a team of people with anime collections who volunteered to be contacts and copy anime tapes for people who'd send in blanks and return postage. I know a lot of independent anime fans who did the same thing.

Jeff Blend got volunteered to do a lot of the tape copying for the EDC, as I recall.

Most of us would much rather trade title for title. It's always more interesting to get something new to watch, even if it wasn't a title you were actively seeking, and you could put it on your list and maybe it would be interesting to somebody who had something you wanted. Eventually you'd build relationships with other tape traders and they'd copy tapes for you without trading anything, and vice versa.

And of course once we started having club meetings there were always 2 VCRs in the back of the room copying somebody's copy of something. We had decks running in our hotel rooms at conventions, if we ran something cool in the anime room somebody would have their deck wired up to it to copy the screening tape while it was playing, once we started going to Project A-Kon everybody had three or four decks going in their hotel rooms.

I do think it would be worthwhile to talk to some of the mid 1980s era anime fans from the LA or SF areas and find out what their tape trading customs were. I imagine once VCRs and blank tape got cheaper and things got less "precious," the gate-keeping got less and less -whereas in the areas of the country that weren't as exposed to anime fandom, for-profit tape copying went on for years and years. I was still seeing bootlegged VHS tapes at swap meets in Georgia in 2002 (!). We had to close down a "club" selling tapes out of their hotel room at AWA in 2000.
Say, this old rec.arts.anime.misc post talking about Randall Stukey mentioned a SASE system that the C/FO use to distribute tapes. Was this the system you talked about, and why there were all these keywords and designations?

Also, I am surprise that there are still people using rec.arts.anime in 2019.

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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by davemerrill » Tue Apr 23, 2019 5:34 am

"SASE" is an abbreviation for "Self Addressed Stamped Envelope." If you are writing someone and you want them to reply to you in a letter, you include an envelope already addressed to you with postage already attached. This makes it easy for the other person to mail their reply to you.

When trading VHS tapes through the mail, the sender would include the blank tapes and a self-addressed padded envelope with postage already affixed (there was a standard rate for United States first-class mail, so it was easy to figure out what the postage was going to cost). This made it a lot easier for the person copying the tapes to return them.

I have been using the abbreviation SASE all my life - we'd see it every day on children's TV programs that encouraged viewers to write in.

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Re: pages from C/FO Magazine V2 #3

Post by Fireminer » Tue Apr 23, 2019 8:05 am

davemerrill wrote:
Tue Apr 23, 2019 5:34 am
"SASE" is an abbreviation for "Self Addressed Stamped Envelope." If you are writing someone and you want them to reply to you in a letter, you include an envelope already addressed to you with postage already attached. This makes it easy for the other person to mail their reply to you.

When trading VHS tapes through the mail, the sender would include the blank tapes and a self-addressed padded envelope with postage already affixed (there was a standard rate for United States first-class mail, so it was easy to figure out what the postage was going to cost). This made it a lot easier for the person copying the tapes to return them.

I have been using the abbreviation SASE all my life - we'd see it every day on children's TV programs that encouraged viewers to write in.
Thanks you so much for your clarification!

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